1. Preparing Your Estate Plan in 2015

    Preparing your Estate Plan in 2015  Read More...

  2. Are Employees Pre and Post Shift Activities Compensable?

    Are Employees Pre and Post Shift Activities Compensable?   Read More...

  3. Help Shape Bend’s Future!

    Be part of the decision-making about the expansion of the City boundaries.  The City has a fun and interactive survey where you can give input.  Tell the City what goals are important to you, highlight examples of how you think the City can best meet those goals, and show where you would like to see different kinds of housing, businesses and natural areas. Click on the link for the easy-to-use, online survey, found at www.bendoregon.gov/bendugb. Spend anywhere from two minutes to two hours – your choice.  Help shape Bend’s future!  Read More...

  4. Tax-Exempt Status for Small Organizations

    Authored by Sharon Smith  Read More...

  5. $1.5 Million in Grants to Finance Deschutes Basin Water Study

    Bend, Oregon – The U.S. Department of Interior announced on June 9th a $750,000 WaterSMART grant to the Deschutes Basin Board of Control (seven irrigation districts) working with a broad coalition of interests, called the Deschutes Basin Study Work Group (Basin Study Group), for the development of a “Basin-Study.” The federal grant, coupled with a $750,000 State of Oregon grant, will enable this broad coalition to manage $1.5 million for an evaluation of the potential effects of climate change on water supplies, and constructive steps to address the future water needs of cities, farmers, and fish and wildlife in Oregon’s iconic Deschutes Basin. This is one of only three comprehensive river basin studies funded in the U.S.  Read More...

  6. Defining A Lawyer’s Practice Style

    Authored by John Berge   Read More...

  7. 1031 Exchange Can Delay Capital Gains Tax

    Authored by John Sorlie  Read More...

  8. Health Savings Accounts No Longer Subject To Garnishment

    Authored by Mark Reinecke  Read More...

  9. 10 Questions to Ask your Estate Planning Attorney

    Authored by Melissa Lande
    I am often asked what people should ask their estate planning attorney to make sure that their estate plan is complete, well prepared and will properly carry out their intentions. The questions that follow should assist you with preparation of your estate plan. 
    1. I do not have a large estate, why do I need an estate plan? Even if you do not have a significant amount of assets, most people should have a Will or a Trust, Power of Attorney, Advance Directive and Medical Authorization.  These documents allow you to designate a person to make medical and financial decisions for you during your lifetime and allow you to plan for distribution of your assets after your death.
     2. What happens if I die without a Will or a Trust? If you die without a Will or Trust, your assets will pass to the remaining joint owner(s) or to your designated beneficiaries. If an asset does not have a joint owner or a beneficiary, the asset will be subject to probate. Oregon law provides that if you probate assets without a Will, your assets be transferred to your closest family members or other relatives. However, this can be problematic if you prefer that your spouse or your heirs not receive funds outright. Also, if you are married and have children from a previous marriage, the children are immediately entitled to one-half of your assets if you probate assets without a will. You may prefer to structure your plan differently.
      Read More...

  10. Bereavement Leave Under Oregon Law

    Authored by: Jeremy Green
    Certain Oregon employers are now required to provide bereavement leave to eligible employees.  Effective January 1, 2014, HB 2950 requires an employer subject to the Oregon Family Leave Act (i.e., an Oregon employer with 25 or more employees) to provide an OFLA eligible employee (i.e., an employee who has been employed for more than 180 days an average of 25 or more hours per week) two weeks of bereavement leave within 60 days of the date on which the employee receives notice of the death of a family member.  Qualifying bereavement leave includes leave to attend the funeral of a family member, marking arrangements necessitated by the death of a family member, and grieving the death of a family member.  HB 2950 defines “family member” as the employee’s spouse, same-sex domestic partner, biological, adoptive, or foster parent, child, grandparent, or grandchild, parent-in-law, or a person with whom the employee was in an in loco parentis relationship.
    An eligible employee desiring to take bereavement leave must provide oral notice within 24 hours of the start of leave.  The employee must also provide written notice within three days after the employee returns to work.  Notwithstanding the aforementioned notice requirements, an employer may not limit bereavement leave if the employee fails to provide appropriate notice.  An employer may require the employee to use his or her accrued vacation or paid sick leave during bereavement leave. 

      Read More...